Stunning Ellie Cashman Floral Linen

No ones opening the door… guess it’s clear she’s gone. 

I have found true fabric love with Ellie Cashman and her moody dark floral designs. I recently made a ball gown (here) that is a digital print silk charmuse. The fabric I chose for the Chardon skirt was a printed linen because if you are going to spend that amount of money on one piece of fabric and postage from overseas, you should always make the cost of postage more reasonable by ordering additional fabric. That, dear readers, is logic!Ellie’s designs are exquisite and the underlying darkness in her design ensures it stands apart from that prettiness that is so often found in florals. Her designs are a mix of over sized blooms with digital enhancement and the odd butterfly floating in a sea of petals that give it a strong edge.

This is my Dirty Dancing moment, much to the horror of B1 and B2. I was, after all, having the time of my life. The water lilies were in fine form. And my death pose. May my inner gothling always be present.
The top is the Tiny Pocket tank (OOP) from Grainline Studio which I believe has now been updated to a similar pattern called  Willow. I find this top very flattering with the addition of some shaping in the side seams. I stumbled upon the cotton lace overlay and silk remnant at The Fabric Store and was down to the millimetre to cut the Tiny Pocket out. The silk hangs below the lace which I’m quite pleased with when it is sitting over the skirt but I think it will be more likely tucked in. I used some black silk bias to finish the neck and arms that I’d made many moons ago to add some contrast. The the ribbon was originally threaded around the waist however it didn’t sit well so I’ve left it at the back to give a little extra gather and definition to the waist. The linen I used for the Chardon skirt was the Dark Floral II light by Ellie Cashman and it was heaven to sew with. No fading with washing and it retained its original beautiful structure which held the pleats of the Chardon skirt so well whilst providing a little pouf. The pleats seemed to give the flowers even more depth as they overlapped. The skirt went together beautifully and having sized down from my previous version, is now more fitted around the waist. And of course it has pockets. As this is such a special skirt, I hemmed it with vintage lace gifted to me by Marjorie. She was kind enough to send me a collection of vintage laces from her personal collection last year that I could incorporate into my sewing. My mantra remains the same after all these years: Liberty, Linen and Lace. I hand picked the zip  due the thickness of the fabric and to ensure greater control over where it was placed. It sits flatly across the derriere and has all the good curves in just the right places.That centre flower looks so three dimensional within the folds of the pleats. Even when laying out the fabric it looked magical. I also caught a reclusive bug and lonely cute butterfly on the front skirt piece.

Thank you also to Chuleenan who convinced me with her versions of the Deer and Doe Chardon skirt that it is a fabulous pattern.

I suspect I may have enough left fabric over to make some beautiful cushions as well for my bedroom. Or should I try a top? Too many decisions for the poor brain today.

On the health front, my recent surgery was a complete success however surgical menopausal shock is about as much fun as it sounds. Hopefully with some more adjustments I’ll be back to work in a week or so and can get back to this wonderful thing called life. And my belly can deflate again. The poor little thing is still swollen. The scaring has healed beautifully but the poufiness of the tummy remains. In the meantime it’s rest, sew, and keep up fluids. And try not to complain too much. How do women not talk about what a horrendous thing menopause is! It’s really rather horrid. And I’ve been through many horrid things. But I now have this beautiful dark floral skirt for which I am most grateful.

Photos by Bruce. Location at Deakin University Waurn Ponds. Dark floral II fabric purchased from Ellie Cashman. (I’m saving up to purchase another piece to make a bed head…). Chardon skirt pattern by Deer and Doe. Tiny pocket tank by Grainline Studio, now reissued as the Willow.  Shoes from Camper. Tights from Wolford. Vintage jewellery from JeanJeanVintage. Flower crown by Gardens of Whimsy.

Brighten your Day with Daisies

Daisy 8The history of daisies is that they demonstrate trust and loyalty. They are also often given to a person who is ill to brighten up their day. Fitting given that today I’m suffering the most amazing female malaise of surgical menopause. It’s great really. You roll 1-5 years of symptoms into overnight and then try and figure out how the world works again. If anyone ever mentions male menopause to me, beware, for I may get feisty….daisy 9

Whilst I may not have a bouquet of daisies, I certainly have my daisy blanket which makes me feel as though I’m wrapped in hugs of flowers.

daisy 10

As does Panda Wine

In the past I’ve made these for friends who are having babies, and even one for a friend who wanted to wrap herself a daisy shawl and read books by her giraffe lamp that I made her whilst sipping Irish breakfast tea. Daisies are for everyone.  daisy1

I’ve been making daisies since I was about 12 years old. but never had the skill to piece them together. My mother made traditional layettes for her three children, and I was the lucky recipient of two. When I turned 40 I was determined to acquire the skill of crocheting the daisies together and such success I had! Daisy3

The shawl I made included 810 individual daisies and the historical documenter that Instagam is tells me I started it July 2015 . Crochet began 4 September 2015. Finished 25 February 2016. Loved for ever. daisy4

I even made concurrent blue and red ones for B1 and B2 last year. When I wake them in the morning the doona is discarded on the floor and they are enveloped in their daisies. 6 months work with a little help from my official daisy maker. Daisy6

These photo’s are over a year old again,taken at Castlemaine which I love. I wrapped myself in daisies and read Absent without Leave by Paul Livingston. I love war stories even though they are usually heart breaking. daisy5

He bought a piece of needle work of a 1960’s holden that he made in year 10 at school. Respect for the crafty comedian who can also write. Daisy7

I’ve passed patten onto a few people so let me know if you are interested. I believe it is out of print and out of copyright. I may also do a tutorial once I’ve made some progress into my Liberty hexi quilt. Small Liberty donations most welcome!

Photo’s by Bruce. Daisy shawl by Pips. Setting at Green Gablesnj in Castlemaine. Gabriola skirt in Liberty by Sewaholic. Self drafted camisole in Liberty. Head scarf from VintageCaf